Tag Archive for simple recipes

Not Just for Hugging Trees: Cauliflower Millet Mashup

Like Birkenstocks, millet isn’t just for hippies anymore. If I can be any force for the reintroduction into the mainstream of the wonders of millet, let it be so. As far as grains go, it has a good amount of vegetarian protein (6 grams), it’s gluten free for people practicing an auto-immune protocol, or those who are sensitive to the gluten, AND it tastes relish.

One of the problems with millet is it’s gotten some pretty bad PR. But look, if Helen Mirren can proclaim her love of Crocs and still be so hot, then you can give millet a try.

Let’s start with my current food darling, Amy Chaplain, and cook up a version of her mash. I have made this stuff EVERY week for 3 weeks since I got the book. I’ve served garlic greens on it, eggs, stirred in mushroom medleys and stuff roasted squash with it. It’s divine. Not only do you get a kind of corn-like flavor profile, you also get the added nutrient dense benefits of cauliflower along with it. PLUS, for kids who love grains and stray from vegetables THIS IS WHERE YOU CAN MESS WITH YOUR KIDS!!! It all looks beige to them and goddess knows, children love boring beige food. Look, I’m not trying to insult your kids, but AM I WRONG??!?!?! No. So try this. They won’t suspect a thing.

It’s fast, it’s versatile, it’s great for a whole family and it’s so affordable as quinoa skyrockets and cauliflower comes into season.

Ingredients

1 medium head cauliflower
1c millet, soaked overnight
1 1/2t sea salt
1/2t ground black pepper
2 1/2c water or vegetable stock

Rinse off your soaked grains and put them in the pot with the florets from your cauliflower, the broth/water and the S&P. Which is to say, PUT EVERYTHING IN THE POT. Bring the mix to a boil, then turn down to simmer and cover for 20 minutes. Check to see if all the liquid has been absorbed right about now. Then mash everything together.

You can add sautéed mushrooms, crispy onions or leeks, top with tamarin, flax oil, walnut oil or any other flavor you’re going for. Stirring in fresh spinach is delicious. Adding hippie dust is great too. The render greens are flash-cooked just by the heat of the mash and it’s DELICIOUS. Top with a toasted seed and nut mixture for crunch or have it on seed toast. Experiment! Let me know your favorite concoctions.

YUM.

 

Hippie Dust: How We Fell In Love

Throw some hippie dust on that!

And so, with that direction bellowed over an enormous bowl of popcorn one fateful evening about 12 years ago, began my love affair with nutritional yeast. Actually, the love began as many affairs do, in a state of acrimony and denial with undercurrent of a tug pulling me toward something inexplicable. My first taste resulted in a somewhat crumply face of disgust as compared to a popcorn bowl full of delicious melted butter and salt with fresh ground pepper. But something about the nuttiness of the unexpected yeast pulled me back. And in no time at all, I was all in.

Nutritional yeast has an enormous benefit to many people over its cousins brewer’s yeast and baker’s yeast. This yeast, grown mostly on beet sugar is an inactive yeast which means it can be incorporated into a nutritional arsenal of a system that is often challenged by other active yeasts. (Of course, ask your doctor or nutritionist their view on this for your health.) Hippie dust is a dynamo of benefits packed into a magic flourish over foods for a nutty, almost cheesy, flavor. Look here:

1. Vitamin B-12- This is a crucial nutrient for the body involved in the production of red blood cells and for producing and maintaining myelin, the protective insulation around your nerves. Most sources of Vitamin B-12 are animal based, so nutritional yeast is a major player in the nutritional well being of vegans and vegetarians. One tablespoon will provide an adult with a full day’s supply of B-12, if you can keep the tastiness to that!

2. Protein- 2 tablespoons of hippie dust contains 9 grams of protein. That’s more than in 1 cup of whole milk (8g), a large egg (6g), or one oz. of beef (7g). It’s a wonderful source of energy for your workout mornings.

3. Fiber- Fiber is one of my personal favorites in terms of gut health and functional digestion. It also helps our systems regulate blood sugar giving us a more sustainable even store of energy throughout our days and at higher levels. Nutritional yeast provides 3 grams of fiber per tiny serving.

4. Gluten Free- Not only a boon for the Vegans out there, but this treat is also gluten free providing all of this power with an anti-inflammatory ease.

5. Folic acid- Nutritional yeast is also a great source of folic acid. Especially important for women out there trying to get pregnant or carrying future citizens of the planet, folic acid is known to prevent spina bifida and other major birth defects. For those not planning to get pregnant, folic acid is still important for its role in cell maintenance and production.

Here’s one of the easiest recipes in the world and it’ll wow your dinner guests as well.

1 head cauliflower
1T olive oil
1t black sesame seeds
1/4c nutritional yeast
Sea Salt and black pepper to taste

Preheat your oven to 350. Take all the ingredients and drop them in a mixing bowl. Toss it with your hands until all is coated. Spread on a cooking sheet with parchment paper or foil and cook for about 20-25 minutes. Cauliflower should be a golden light brown. THAT’S IT!

*Originally, I wrote this article for a wellness site here on the web that I’ve decided not to write for anymore. As it has grown to a pretty impressive size, the site continues to insist on not paying its writers for their work. (COMMON PRACTICE) Not even a dollar. Not with coupons or anything, just “Since we do not compensate contributors for posts, we’re more than happy to include a byline and your brief bio containing links to your website, Facebook, Twitter accounts, which we will promote when your post goes live.” I suppose I got lulled into this belief that I had to continue, after many years as a professional writer, to work for free to promote someone else’s content. In the agreement I found myself also letting my voice be compromised, which is actually my favorite part of writing. When I inquired to the editors about when they planned compensation, fiscal or otherwise, for the writers that wholly drive their content, I got no reply at all.  So I decided to simply write here on my own site and accept that I may stay small, but whatever. At least I’ll stay true. 
This text has been edited from its original form to be reprinted here.

Broccoli and Fennel Soup with Red Onions

How about a quick and dirty post about soup? Great. I’m doing my Summer Cleanse right now so much evenings are occupied by soups. I like to switch it up and lot and to keep it brothy. This means I always have some vegetable stock going using the veggie scraps I pick up for slicing and dicing along the way. Onions ends, kale spines, garlic butts and carrot ends make regular appearances along with ginger skins, parsnip butts and cauliflower cores. I put all the scraps in a bag in the freezer and when the bag gets full I boil them down and BAM, veggie stock. Delightful. You can’t beat it. I sometimes add a dash of salt and pepper to mine. The other thing I keep on hand that shores up a soup with richness is the cooked liquid from batches of beans. Pot liquor gives a depth to soup that plain water doesn’t even approach, and as a lady lover of big flavor, I appreciate that. Any time I look into the fridge and see a mason jar of either one of those, I know I’m going to be just fine.

Well, Sunday was just such a day… the kind of day where all feels kind of lost. You’re on a cleanse, nothing is prepped, you’re staring at a soup that you’ve had one too many nights in a row and you’re still in shock about how bad Project Runway looks this season. But look… there’s some veggie broth, and so collect what else you have and MAKE IT WORK.

1 fat stalk broccoli
1 red onion
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1 bulb fennel
5c vegetable stock
1/4c nutritional yeast
2t ground black pepper
1t celery salt
1 1/2T olive oil

To prep, separate your broccoli into florets and then remove the hard outer skin from the stalk. Chop the inside of the stalk into coins and set aside. Chop your fennel as thin as possible all the way up to the fronds. You’ll include all of it in the soup. Chop up your red onion as well. Heat your olive oil up and add your peppercorn, onion, fennel, broccoli stalk coins, and garlic. When everything is coated and the onion and fennel begin to soften, add about 3T of vegetable stock. When everything is boiling, add in the hippie dust, I mean yeast, and stir until it’s a golden vegetable roux. Add in the rest of the veggie broth and the celery salt. Bring everything to a rolling boil, then turn down to a simmer and add your broccoli florets. Cook for 20-40 minutes based on how you like your vegetables in soup.

Latke Compendium: The Finish Line

I sometimes feel like the condiments are the best part of the show. My friend Elizabeth is a fantastic cook and when we make brunch together, the table is a veritable solar system of dips, sauces, sides, and toppings. Our bunches have eggs to order and yogurt to anchor everything, and even though the eggs will sport deep yellow yolks of happy hens who possibly roost on hand quilted thrones and the yogurt comes from cows so happy that we actually spy them all getting mani/pedi/udder massages (this is a lie), the real stars always lay in the orbiting mismatched bowls. Elizabeth brings her homemade caraway kraut, local honey from a friend’s bees in the Mission, dark and caramel. She makes jam and homemade salsa. Ginger will throw down with perfect southern biscuits and even started making some gluten-free ones for me, and we’ll put her cinnamon vanilla sunflower seed butter on them and close our eyes when we chew. I tote in a chutney of spiced fruits and pomegranate pear champagne vinaigrette for the massaged shaved kale salad with hazelnuts and fennel. We eat and pass bowls. We laugh and top each bite with different crowns. We brunch like champions, lazy and happy as the great world spins and we sip tea like there’s no work to do or bad phone calls to get. It’s condiment brunch and it’s one of my favorite days.

I also want to say that one of the best things about gathering people these days is the fact that everyone has different food needs. I live in San Francisco where you can’t spit without hitting someone who is going gluten free or paleo or vegan. Myself included. I do cleanses each season and I want people to just like food and feel good. So all these different desires that used to cause eye rolling and panic are now just an invitation for me to learn new things to make, find ways to bring together all kinds of new foods and make it No Big Deal. Because really, it’s not. It’s totally a blast. Send me your food needs and sensitivities, people. I AM NOT AFRAID.

Here’s some lemon creme fraiche on top of a beluga lentil soup drizzled with olive oil

CREME FRAICHE: So your latke gathering is now prepared with applesauce from yesterday. Today I bring you the creamy stuff to plop on your latkes. You won’t believe how friggin’ EASY it is to impress people with things like homemade creme fraiche. Making anything with the implication of a French accent really bowls your American pals over. But really all you have to do is this: The night before your party, put 2 tablespoons of buttermilk in a cup of heavy cream in a bowl. Cover the bowl with a pretty towel you like so in the morning it’ll be like being greeted by a chorus of angels. Not to get too Christmassy at Hanukkah, but whatever. I live in a mixed house. Let the bowl sit for like 12 hours or more if you like. Maybe up to 16. Then mix the creme and put it in the fridge until you want to serve it.

Is that it?
YES, MARY !!!!
Creme fraiche for the people.

This condiment is incredibly fun to modify for a good time. Meyer lemons are in season right now and you can zest one and squeeze a tiny bit in for a good tangy version. You can add harissa and about 3 finely diced olives for a Moroccan flavor or you can have a Greek kind of number with cucumbers and cilantro. This is a topping that just keeps giving. Tis the season after all.

VEGAN CASHEW CREAM Again, Mary, this is so easy, girl. Here’s what you need:

1c raw cashews
1/2 c filtered water

Soak your cashews for about 6 hours. They don’t need to soak as long as almonds do. They’ll plump up and turn white, which is appetizing for a cream situation. Pour off the water. Don’t use the soaking water in the next step. Ew. Now put your soaked cashews in a blender and cover them with new filtered water. I cover mine just barely. The less water, the creamier the sauce. Puree for several minutes. You want the nuts completely blended with no chunks or anything.

Is that it?
YES, MARY !!!!
Vegan creme for the people.

NOW, if you want vegan SOUR cream, just add in 1 t apple cider vinegar and the juice of one small lemon.

Play around with these. toppings are so fun and it’s easy to find your signature taste. People will be all up in your grill to bring the fantastic blah blah to the next neighborhood mixer. And you’ll be happy to because it’s fun to be the big hero in literally 5 minutes. Oh look, my inner Leo is showing.

Sugar Detox: The Wonderful, The Ecstatic, and the SUPER UGLY, plus bonus popsicles.

photo (46)

I’ve quit doing a lot of things in my life. Smoking took a few times. Like 6. Each time I picked up, I chose a new brand, the last one being hand-rolled numbers that smelled sweet and earthy twirling into a column between my thumb and two fingers. I’m hoping this last effort from a few years back will do it for good. I quit smoking weed, I dunno when that happend, it just went away. I quit coffee a few times, have it only on the rare road trip because something about crappy road coffee with radioactive French Vanilla creamer still appeals to me. Also

Love/Hate

Dunkin’ Donuts coffee whenever in Boston is a must, also French Vanilla. (I don’t want you to get the idea I don’t know anything about coffee, although it’s ok if your impression is that, like summer vacation, I have no class. But I do take my decaf cravings to irritatingly divine local micro roasteries.) I gave up crystal meth and dreamed about it for weeks, making nights long and not so restful. Also falling by the wayside came pretty much the rest of the DEA Schedule II drugs, watching America’s Next Top Model, apathy, dating assholes, and you guess it, refined sugars. And guess which one was the worst?

This stuff makes me INSANE

Correct.

The gosh dang SUGAR.  More difficult than giving up the dashing butch rogues even. Why bother? It made me so crazy. I would watch myself polish off a whole pound of gummi bears, eating even after my tongue started to fritz out. I’d plow through chocolate forgetting entirely to enjoy it, and pastries would find their way to oblivion in my hands, only at the last few bites, me realizing I hadn’t any recollection of the beginning, sometimes leading me to try again with another. I’d miss conversations with people trying to discern if I was looking casual while angling to get enough pie, then worry that everyone noticed how weirdly I ate the entire shared dessert. Plus the kicker was I had no FREEDOM in the matter.

Everybody loves Tim Riggins.

Now, I am a lady who believes wholly in choice. I am a feminist who believes we women can have health at any size and when we have peace, our bodies will respond by asking for what they need and reside in healthy places if we give them that. But in the throws of sugar, I had no choice. I was simply a disembodied hand reaching for themed sheet cakes from Safeway. It started to really piss me off that not only did I feel unhappy in the feminist body I was dragging my great life around in, but also that I had to reckon with the fact that after I had dumped all these chemicals, I still had this one completely controlling me. I was kind of sugar’s little plaything. And so little by little, I tried to get out from under it. The short of it is, it took a few tries.

5 days worth of this.

It felt like shit. Sugar detox is no joke: scorching headaches, bouts of total rage, entire acres of real estate in the mind occupied by what feels like a prison of No Fun for the rest of time. Aches, creaks, lethargy came round calling, the likes of which I had not experienced since the crystal meth left my system, plus just good old fashioned self-pity.

And then there’s the after: about five days later, my brain began to clear. Then it actually kept clearing. My focus got sharper and sharper. My energy went nuts, like I was high but with no tweaker feelings at all. I just woke into the world, clear and energized, ready to do my thing. My insane cravings for sugar waned and oddly, so did my cravings for other things: chips and pizza and cheeseburgers. It isn’t that I never got them, it’s that they registered as clues rather than commands. Cheeseburger daydreams, which I’ve been having constantly during the first 5 days of this cleanse, translate to protein. When I get enough, the craving vanishes. I get to have choices about the protein I take. Chips usually mean I want crunchy things. This also, for me, indicates I’m stressed out, irritated, or annoyed. So it also indicates a trip to the gym or a run is in order. In the mean time I can crunch on carrots or bell peppers or the best crackers ever, Sami’s (gluten free) millet and flax chips. Pizza means I have good taste. WHO THE HELL DOESN’T WANT PIZZA!?!? And for the most part, I rarely eat the iconic things that come up if they are going to impact my well being. And if I do choose to have them, it’s not because I am caving in. I get really good stuff, eat it slowly, savor it, ENJOY MY LIFE, and the gifts that taste and texture have to offer. The 15 pounds I dropped when I quit sugar helped as well. It was nice for my wallet because I didn’t have to shop for new clothes. I felt more comfortable moving in the world, and I finally got some idea of the weight my body felt the best at. It had been years since I had any clue, if ever.

The other thing that happened is I got more creative with food. I began cooking more, reading labels and understanding the way my body felt in reaction to things. Agave came around as the world’s next answer to living without the all powerful sweetness of life, but that also made me feel cracked out. Turns out it’s processed much like corn syrup so that makes sense. But brown rice syrup tasted great and I felt fine eating it. Small treats of maple syrup and honey also work for me. Whole fruit is my favorite. And like I said earlier, lately I’ve been obsessed with popsicles. All the ones I make are sugar-free and pretty delightful. These ones have quite a kick:

Put about 3/4 c of pineapple hunks, an 8oz. container of raw coconut water, a knuckle of ginger and 1/2 a cucumber in the blender. Whirl it around and then freeze your pops. Makes 5. And each has 25 calories. If you care about that kind of thing.

Roasted Nectarine and Tarragon Yogurt Pops

There was some flying all over

Good gravy!!! Where the hell have I been? Well, lots of places, actually. I’ve been in Vermont, Massachusetts, Alabama and beautiful New Orleans Louisiana, y’all. Also I’ve been right here, researching, coaching, reading and cooking. But first, here’s some pictures of some places and stuff just for fun.

Burr Pond with my mom in Vermont

Triple Garlic Yukons with garlic scapes

A beautiful living room in MA

Plus a beautiful hike in the woods

 

Gulf Shores working vacation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lunch Break between Clients

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Big Easy Co-Op

French Quarter Horns for Sale

Pink Tree on Magazine Str

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So there’s a little bit of what I’ve been doing. But now I’m home and I’m in the kitchen and back at the gym and basically ready to rumble. By home, I mean back in San Francisco, where it rarely gets hot as hell, and usually not until October. Nonetheless, it’s been hot where I’ve been and it kept me dreaming of popsicles. I mean I could not keep the ideas of the icy little things away. Ideas in the shower. Ideas strolling down the street. Ideas upon rising. Ideas waiting in lines. And then finally home to collect popsicle molds and get to it!

The first batch was incredible. Off the hook. Not to brag. Raw coconut water, fresh pluots, and five big fat leaves of basil. Blend. Freeze. For real that’s all it takes and they are NUTSO good. My other ideas have been a touch more labor intensive, but not much. You can totally make these. I had to make em quick to get the yogurt out of the house, as Friday I am beginning my Sweet Summer Cleanse, and dairy and I will be taking a hiatus from each other. Until then, you’ll find me enjoying these.

2 ripe nectarines
2 healthy sprigs of fresh tarragon
1c plain yogurt
1T dark honey
cinnamon for dusting
1t olive oil
1/2t sunflower oil

Preheat your oven to 375. Next, halve your nectarines and get the pit out. Be careful s sometimes the pit wants to stay. Rub all four halves with olive oil. You will probably not need the whole teaspoon but feel free to get generous. Dust liberally with cinnamon. I use Vietnamese cinnamon because it has a particular flavor that makes me feel pretty relentlessly happy. But any cinnamon is a friend of mine, really. Now roast the fruit for 20-30 minutes, until soft.

Meanwhile, on your burner, heat up your sunflower oil. Use all the leaves of tarragon from your sprig and saute until translucent and fragrant. The photo above shows the amount of leaves and the way they should look. Maybe 2 minutes. Put the cinnamon nectarines, tarragon and honey all into your blender and whirl around until it’s all smooth. Pour into your popsicle molds and freeze. Yields 5 pops. 5 INCREDIBLY delicious pops. Each one has 3.1 grams of protein, 49 calories, and a good hunk of B-12. Fantastic dessert!

Homemade Juice.

Aside from toiling in school toward my beloved Holistic Health Counseling certification, I also hold down a job. It’s a great job, actually. For over five years I’ve been a part owner in one of the largest worker owned food co-ops in these fine United States, Rainbow Grocery in San Francisco. When I started working there, I felt a little bit overwhelmed with people’s different takes on food, nutrition, supplements and general well-being. I was grateful to be tucked in the far aisle where shoppers came over to secretly crop dust (fart) and the concerns revolved largely around dog treats and kitchen cleaners with the assorted sink sponge query. The most in depth health related questions I got revolved around juicers and water filters. At the time, juicing, as a verb, struck me as pretty far out and strange.

Five years later, the writer inside me still finds the use of the verb kind of linguistically disappointing, but the practice is well established in my life. I like to call it “making juice” rather than juicing. Maybe I’m a language snob. So be it. I can live with that authentic assessment of my personal shortcoming.

Ginger and I invested in a Champion juicer, a masticating variety, that we employ often. There’s a ton of models out there and sometimes I wonder what it might be like to have chosen a Breville. The Champion makes amazing juice and in that respect I give it an A. It is also known to last round about a total LIFETIME. But it’s heavy, it takes up a lot of counter space which is annoying in a small kitchen, and it’s fairly irritating to clean. That being said, I LOVE THE JUICE.

The juicer extracts the liquids from the fruits and vegetables and separates everything from the fiber. Wait, you think, isn’t fiber so good for you? Why, yes. Yes it is. So why would a person make juice?

One result of removing the fiber is that the nutrients absorb into the system like a rocket launch. BAM! It can feel like a fantastic jolt of energy pinging immediately around your brain, which is a nice feeling forst thing in the morning. Not like a coffee jolt, which I understand can be euphoric, but more like someone has taken a windex to your mind and body and cleaned it off. There’s no haze between you and the world. So that’s nice. The other thing is that it’s a cooling and alkalinizing wave to our systems. As people often ingesting a western menu, we sustain one of the most acidic and inflammatory diets on the planet. Homemade fresh raw juice is a powerful tonic for this mass cultural intake. And as a bonus, it tastes fantastic and is a great tool if you’re trying to kick refined sugar. The juice is sweet, and absorbs quickly without turning you into a psychotic banshee. At least that’s a bonus that happens for me.

Recipe? OK. Here’s what I did Friday night (if that tells you anything about my rock and roll lifestyle). I made a half gallon of juice with all the stuff Ginger and I hauled home from the store. One thing to bear in mind for money saving and holistic consumption is that a lot of things we toss for cooking can be used for making juice: broccoli stalks, radish greens, and beet greens to name a few.

This cooling juice is made from:

beets
apples
carrots
daikon greens
English cucumber
kale
rapini

Friday Night Lights

 

Try something new: Maitake

IMG_0908

One thing that can get in the way of people ramping up their healthy cooking practices is the fear that they don’t know what to do. I have that one too. I often recommend to clients that they wander through the bulk grains or produce section and select something they’ve never worked with to bring home. Then you do a little research on the ole internerd and Voila: Lunch.

This week has seen so many people in my beloved San Francisco struggling with some flu that’s putting folks in bed for over a week. Sometimes two. So I’ve been focusing on staying in my heartiest state and supporting my system with good food. Also, I’ve been a little bit tired of my choices. Wanting to keep it simple, I headed down to the farmers market dreaming of this dish I had last week at Cha-Ya, a vegetarian Japanese joint on Valencia Street. It’s a simple place bobbing its head in a sea of hip restaurants and sleek boutiques. The food is clean and easy. Nothing fancy. Although lotus roots show up and that’s not a daily treat in my world. I often forget about the restaurant, it’s so quiet, and then I’ll walk by and my brain will fritz out about the simple flavors of it, the earthy miso, the symphony of colors presented on the plates, the perfectly cooked buckwheat soba, a mix of give and chew. The dish I ordered had some great mushrooms in it.

So I took my own advice, resolved to get creative and bold as I made my way through UN Plaza Market. The shapes and covens of fungus called to me, like little aliens of immunity, culinary amulets in hoards under a green awning. I picked out a cluster of gorgeous maitake mushrooms at the Far West Fungi stand, along with some shiitake and the fancy mustard colored chanterelles I will research tonight to figure out. These particular tree mushrooms seem almost holy to me in their medicinal properties. I suppose I’ve never tried cooking with the maitakes out of a deep fear that I will eff it all up in the kitchen and waste such a sought after resource. Renowned for the boosting the immune system (the mushroom is also sought after for fighting cancer as well as for treating the side effects that many chemo patients suffer from) I choose it boldly because I want to be fortified against the creeping crud sickness taking over those around me. So I go simple, And here’s what happens:

 

Maitake and Shiitake Stir Fry

1c. short grain brown rice

1 purple yam (any sweet potato, yam, or squash cubes will work)

1 stalk broccoli

2 cloves garlic, diced

1 knuckle of ginger, diced

1T extra virgin olive oil

1T tamari

1 cluster maitake mushrooms

6 pretty shiitake mushrooms

1T rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar

1t sesame seeds

1/2 avocado

Take 1c rice and rinse it real good. Dump it into a heavy bottom pot and cover with 2c. water. Add a tablespoon tamari and bring to a boil. Turn the flame down to low and simmer, covered for 40 minutes until all the liquid is absorbed.

In a skillet, heat up olive oil and toss in the garlic and ginger. Cook for a minute or two. Add the broccoli and sweet potato. After everything starts to soften, add about 2T water to bring moisture to the whole thing. Add all the mushrooms. Turn down the heat to medium low. Cover for about twenty minutes.

Take the rice off and stir in the vinegar. Lay the rice at the bottom of a bowl that feels pleasing to cup in your hands. Add stir fry on top. Add cubed avocado on top and sprinkle with sesame seeds. You can drizzle with a little more tamari to taste.

You are ready to feel great and ward off the bug that’s going around. Plus, for me, I cooked with something new, it tasted wonderful, and made a real pretty addition to my photo collection as well. Being willing to mess everything up really paid off.